Kubespray – 10 Simple Steps for Installing a Production-Ready, Multi-Master HA Kubernetes Cluster

By | October 13, 2018

Use this tutorial alongside the official Kubespray Github documentation for clear guidance on installing Kubespray with Ansible.

If you are on this page and reading along, that means you are a Kubernetes enthusiast and have already tried your hand with Kubernetes. So the assumption will be that you are already good with basics of K8S and are now looking for some real implementation stuff.

While deploying K8s on production environments it’s a common observation that the master node becomes a single point of failure, and any business-critical production environments can’t afford to have that. So the need for HA of master nodes arrives to mitigate this scenario.

Kubespray gives a simple and easy way to install a multi-master, production-ready HA cluster for deploying any business-critical applications.

So let’s begin…

The official Kubespray GitHub link is here, but the installation steps mentioned are very minimal. So I will try to expand them in details:

Prerequisites:

Perform the following steps on all servers that need to be added in cluster:

1. Disable SELinux:

~]# setenforce 0
~]# sed -i –follow-symlinks ‘s/SELINUX=enforcing/SELINUX=disabled/g’ /etc/sysconfig/selinux

2. Set the firewall rules on all “master” Servers:

~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=6443/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=2379-2380/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10250/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10251/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10252/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10255/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –reload
~]# modprobe br_netfilter
~]# echo ‘1’ > /proc/sys/net/bridge/bridge-nf-call-iptables
~]# sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

On all “node” servers:

~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10250/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=10255/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=30000-32767/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –permanent –add-port=6783/tcp
~]# firewall-cmd –reload
~]# echo ‘1’ > /proc/sys/net/bridge/bridge-nf-call-iptables
~]# sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

If possible, you can stop firewall service on all servers in the cluster:

~]# systemctl stop firewalld

3. Install some prerequisites packages on all servers in the cluster

Ansible:

~]# sudo yum install epel-release
~]# sudo yum install ansible
Jinja:

~]# easy_install pip
~]# pip2 install jinja2 –upgrade
Python:

~]# sudo yum install python36 –y

4. Enable passwordless login between all servers in the cluster.

So at this stage all the preparation work is completed. Now let’s start with Kubespray activities.
In the example below, we will be installing a 5 server cluster (3 as Master & all 5 as nodes)

5. Git clone the Kubespray repository on one of the master servers:

~]# git clone https://github.com/kubernetes-incubator/kubespray.git

6. Go to the ‘Kubespray’ directory and install all dependency packages

(Install dependencies from requirements.txt)

~]# cd kubespray
~]# sudo pip install -r requirements.txt

Note: While installing all requirements packages, if you get errors related to “requests” package, follow the steps below:

– Download the latest “requests” package (.tar.gz file)

– Untar the tar file and run command — python setup.py install

– If the requests issue still doesn’t resolve, go to “/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages” and rename all requests files and folders there, and re-run the requirements.txt deployment.

7. Copy inventory/sample as inventory/mycluster (change “mycluster” to any name you want for the cluster)

8. Update the Ansible inventory file with inventory builder

~]# declare -a IPS=(172.16.2.2 172.16.2.3 172.16.2.4 172.16.2.5 172.16.2.6)
~]# CONFIG_FILE=inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini python36 contrib/inventory_builder/inventory.py ${IPS[@]}

– It should generate the “inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini” file with following hosts mapping, you can change it as per your need.

[all]
node1 ansible_host=172.16.2.2 ip=172.16.2.2
node2 ansible_host=172.16.2.3 ip=172.16.2.3
node3 ansible_host=172.16.2.4 ip=172.16.2.4
node4 ansible_host=172.16.2.5 ip=172.16.2.5
node5 ansible_host=172.16.2.6 ip=172.16.2.6
[kube-master]
node1
node2
node3
[kube-node]
node1
node2
node3
node4
node5
[etcd]
node1
node2
node3
[k8s-cluster:children]
kube-node
kube-master
[calico-rr]
[vault]
node1
node2
node3

9. Review and change parameters under “inventory/mycluster/group_vars“

inventory/mycluster/group_vars/all.yml
inventory/mycluster/group_vars/k8s-cluster.yml

Some changes you may want to look for are:

– Changingthe network as per your liking in “inventory/mycluster/group_vars/k8s-cluster.yml”

# Choose network plugin (cilium, calico, contiv, weave or flannel)
# Can also be set to ‘cloud’, which lets the cloud provider setup appropriate routing
kube_network_plugin: weave
– In “inventory/mycluster/group_vars/all.yml” uncomment the following line to enable metrics to fetch the cluster resource utilization data without this HPAs will not work (for ‘kubectl top nodes’ & ‘kubectl top pods’ commands to work)

# The read-only port for the Kubelet to serve on with no authentication/authorization. Uncomment to enable.
kube_read_only_port: 10255

Now we are all set for the big, red switch:

10. Deploy Kubespray with Ansible Playbook

~]# ansible-playbook -i inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini cluster.yml

Once this step is completed, the multi-master Kubernetes cluster should be ready for deploying your application.

– Check the status of the cluster now and all nodes should be in ‘Ready’ status:

~]# kubectl get nodes
NAME STATUS ROLES AGE VERSION
node1 Ready master,node 4m v1.10.3
node2 Ready master,node 4m v1.10.3
node3 Ready master,node 4m v1.10.3
node4 Ready node 4m v1.10.3
node5 Ready node 4m v1.10.3

===================================================================

Additional steps might be needed while working with K8s cluster
1. Adding a new node (node6 – 172.16.2.7) to a cluster: If you wish to add a new node server into the cluster, perform following steps:

– Add the server node-6 to “inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini” file

In “[all]” section:

[all]
node1 ansible_host=172.16.2.2 ip=172.16.2.2
node2 ansible_host=172.16.2.3 ip=172.16.2.3
node3 ansible_host=172.16.2.4 ip=172.16.2.4
node4 ansible_host=172.16.2.5 ip=172.16.2.5
node5 ansible_host=172.16.2.6 ip=172.16.2.6
node6 ansible_host=172.16.2.7 ip=172.16.2.7
In “[kube-node]” section: (It can be kept along with other 5 nodes or as a single line also, won’t matter)

[kube-node]
node1
node2
node3
node4
node5
node6
OR

[kube-node]
node6
Now run the following command to scale your cluster:

~]# ansible-playbook -i inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini scale.yml

2. Removing a new node (node6 – 172.16.2.7) from cluster:

– Keep the server to “inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini” file

In “[all]” section:

[all]
node1 ansible_host=172.16.2.2 ip=172.16.2.2
node2 ansible_host=172.16.2.3 ip=172.16.2.3
node3 ansible_host=172.16.2.4 ip=172.16.2.4
node4 ansible_host=172.16.2.5 ip=172.16.2.5
node5 ansible_host=172.16.2.6 ip=172.16.2.6
node6 ansible_host=172.16.2.7 ip=172.16.2.7
In the “[kube-node]” section keep ONLY the node server which needs to be removed from cluster. So in this example, we will keep only “node6” mentioned. (If any other nodes are kept in here, they will also be removed from the cluster)

[kube-node]
node6
Now run the following command to scale your cluster:

~]# ansible-playbook -i inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini remove-node.yml
3. Reset the entire cluster for fresh installation:

Keep the “hosts.ini” updated properly with all servers mentioned in the correct sections, and run the following command:

~]# ansible-playbook -i inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini reset.yml

referal =-> https://dzone.com/articles/kubespray-10-simple-steps-for-installing-a-product

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